Classroom Management

How Much Native Language to Let into the Classroom?

Ben Slavik recently observed a teacher in Denver who kept her students active and engaged for an entire hour without any use of English (her students’ native language) or any blurting by students. He was impressed and wrote an article about it. One of his suggestions was that we make “No English” a rule for our students.

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Classroom Management

Experience??? What is Experience?

Younger teachers often tell me they envy my “experience.” Yet, what does the word really mean? Does it just mean that I’m getting old? What is experience? It has to be more than a mere accumulation of years. It seems to imply a certain wisdom that I have no claim to.

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Articles from the Net

What Is Wrong with Schools?

Yesterday I read a long article by Carol Black that stunned me. In very simple words she explained so many things that I’ve often felt or sensed. At the same time, much of what she says echoes the findings of Stephen Krashen, Alfie Kohn and the latest cutting edge research in neurolinguistics.

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Classroom Strategies

How Can I Teach Pronunciation?

This question was asked recently by a French person who came to the Agen Workshop in July, 2014. She is perfectly bilingual and a creative, hard-working and conscientious teacher of English. She admitted that she didn’t feel comfortable teaching pronunciation.

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Comprehensible Input

My Encounter with Stephen Krashen

This is the third year that I have traveled to Paris for the annual TESOL Colloquium to present TPRS. The other two years I was a speaker and had a small room where I could explain the method to anyone who wanted to come in.

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Conference

Pictures of Agen

In a few months, the third TPRS Workshop in Agen will be ready to start. Teri, Sabrina, Tamara, Daniel and I are looking forward to meeting old friends and making new ones.

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Classroom Strategies

The Verb Flower

Some days, if I want to have some fun, I ask my francophone students how many verb tenses there are in English. Their guesses are all over the place, usually somewhere between ten and twenty. And they are guesses; no one is really sure that they know the answer to my question.

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