Classroom Strategies

Very Narrow Listening

I often feel that we do not devote enough attention to listening, whereas it is obviously an important skill if we are expecting our students to acquire a language through comprehensible input. Perhaps the most important skill of all.

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Conference

Feedback from Carly

“I would absolutely love to come again and I would definitely recommend this conference to any language teacher interested in exploring TPRS and CI. “

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Classroom Strategies

Why I no longer teach Phonics

Teaching phonics means concentrating on form and it only goes into short term memory , which basically means a lot of time and energy spent on very little gain. As Stephen Krashen says, “There’s an easy way and there’s a hard way. And the hard way doesn’t work.”

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Conference

Agen Workshop 2015 – My thoughts

A week ago I was talking to Lillian Stirling and Teri Wiechart about the wonderful workshop that had just ended.  Then I took them to the train, came home and went to bed, finally following my doctor’s orders to rest after a week’s delay. And that is pretty much all I’ve done or accomplished in

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Articles from the Net

What does Stephen Krashen think of TPRS?

“TPRS maintains the innovations of the methods that went before it, but represents a big
increase in interesting input. This is done in two related ways: (1) Stories, co-created by
the student and teacher. Everybody in every culture is interested in stories. (2)
Personalization. In TPRS, the stories and other class activities are about the people the
students care about the most: themselves. “

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Cours d'Anglais

Letter to my students

Students may have false ideas about how they should study. Here are some explanations to help them acquire fluency in a comprehensible input class.

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Comprehensible Input

Comprehensible Input and the Noble Art of Horse-riding

“In the State of Song there was a man who, worried because his sprouts of grain were not growing fast enough, decided to go out to his field and pull on them. Without any idea of what he’d done, he returned home and announced to his family, ‘I am really exhausted today. I’ve been out in the fields helping the sprouts to grow!’ Alarmed, his sons rushed out to the fields to take a look and saw that all the sprouts had shriveled and died.”

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Classroom Strategies

Fluency Writing

Through my comments I wanted my students to know that I was reading what they wrote, reading it for content, not for grammatical correctness, that I was truly interested in what they had to say.

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